What is KALI LINUX ?

Kali Linux is a Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at advanced Penetration Testing and Security Auditing. Kali contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as Penetration Testing, Security research, Computer Forensics and Reverse Engineering. Kali Linux is developed, funded and maintained by Offensive Security.

Kali Linux was released on the 13th March, 2013 as a complete, top-to-bottom rebuild of BackTrack Linux, adhering completely to Debian development standards.

To know how to dual boot kali linux visit the video provided below :

To know how to dual boot your kali linux with windows click on the link given below:

How to dual boot WINDOWS 10 with KALI LINUX ?

More than 600 penetration testing tools included:

They eliminated a great number of tools that either simply did not work or which duplicated other tools that provided the same or similar functionality. Details on what’s included are on the Kali Tools site.

Free and always will be:

Kali Linux, like BackTrack, is completely free of charge and always will be. You will never, ever have to pay for Kali Linux.

Open source Git tree:

Kali community committed to the open source development model and their development tree is available for all to see. All of the source code which goes into Kali Linux is available for anyone who wants to tweak or rebuild packages to suit their specific needs.

FHS compliant:

Kali adheres to the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, allowing Linux users to easily locate binaries, support files, libraries, etc.

Wide-ranging wireless device support:

A regular sticking point with Linux distributions has been supported for wireless interfaces. Kali Linux is built to support as many wireless devices as we possibly can, allowing it to run properly on a wide variety of hardware and making it compatible with numerous USB and other wireless devices.

Custom kernel, patched for injection:

As penetration testers, the development team often needs to do wireless assessments, so their kernel has the latest injection patches included.

Developed in a secure environment:

The Kali Linux team is made up of a small group of individuals who are the only ones trusted to commit packages and interact with the repositories, all of which is done using multiple secure protocols.

GPG signed packages and repositories:

Every package in Kali Linux is signed by each individual developer who built and committed it, and the repositories subsequently sign the packages as well.

Multi-language support:

Although penetration tools tend to be written in English, they have ensured that Kali includes true multilingual support, allowing more users to operate in their native language and locate the tools they need for the job.

Completely customizable:

They thoroughly understand that not everyone will agree with their design decisions, so they have made it as easy as possible for our more adventurous users to customize Kali Linux to their liking, all the way down to the kernel.

ARMEL and ARMHF support:

Since ARM-based single-board systems like the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black, among others, are becoming more and more prevalent and inexpensive, they knew that Kali’s ARM support would need to be as robust as we could manage, with fully working installations for both ARMEL and ARMHFsystems. Kali Linux is available on a wide range of ARM devices and has ARM repositories integrated with the mainline distribution. So tools for ARM are updated in conjunction with the rest of the distribution.

Kali Linux is specifically tailored to the needs of penetration testing professionals, and therefore all documentation on this site assumes prior knowledge of, and familiarity with, the Linux operating system in general.

 

What make KALI LINUX different from other OS ?

Kali Linux is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing. To achieve this, several core changes have been implemented in Kali Linux which reflect these needs:

Single user, root access by design:

Due to the nature of security audits, Kali Linux is designed to be used in a “single, root user” scenario. Many of the tools used in penetration testing require escalated privileges, and while it’s generally sound policy to only enable root privileges when necessary, in the use cases that Kali Linux is aimed at, this approach would be a burden.

Network services disabled by default:

Kali Linux contains systemd hooks that disable network services by default. These hooks allow us to install various services on Kali Linux, while ensuring that our distribution remains secure by default, no matter what packages are installed. Additional services such as Bluetooth are also blacklisted by default.

Custom Linux kernel:

Kali Linux uses an upstream kernel, patched for wireless injection.

A minimal and trusted set of repositories:

given the aims and goals of Kali Linux, maintaining the integrity of the system as a whole is absolutely key. With that goal in mind, the set of upstream software sources which Kali uses is kept to an absolute minimum. Many new Kali users are tempted to add additional repositories to their sources.list, but doing so runs a very serious risk of breaking your Kali Linux installation.

kali linux

Is KALI LINUX right for You ?

Kali is a Linux distribution specifically geared towards professional penetration testers and security specialists, and given its unique nature, it is NOT a recommended distribution if you’re unfamiliar with Linux or are looking for a general-purpose Linux desktop distribution for development, web design, gaming, etc.

Even for experienced Linux users, Kali can pose some challenges. Although Kali is an open source project, it’s not a wide-open source project, for reasons of security. The development team is small and trusted, packages in the repositories are signed both by the individual committer and the team, and — importantly — the set of upstream repositories from which updates and new packages are drawn is very small. Adding repositories to your software sources which have not been tested by the Kali Linux development team is a good way to cause problems on your system.

While Kali Linux is architected to be highly customizable, don’t expect to be able to add random unrelated packages and repositories that are “out of band” of the regular Kali software sources and have it Just Work. In particular, there is absolutely no support whatsoever for the apt-add-repository command, LaunchPad, or PPAs. Trying to install Steam on your Kali Linux desktop is an experiment that will not end well. Even getting a package as mainstream as NodeJS onto a Kali Linux installation can take a little extra effort and tinkering.

If you are unfamiliar with Linux generally, if you do not have at least a basic level of competence in administering a system, if you are looking for a Linux distribution to use as a learning tool to get to know your way around Linux, or if you want a distro that you can use as a general purpose desktop installation, Kali Linux is probably not what you are looking for.

In addition, misuse of security and penetration testing tools within a network, particularly without specific authorization, may cause irreparable damage and result in significant consequences, personal and/or legal. “Not understanding what you were doing” is not going to work as an excuse.

However, if you’re a professional penetration tester or are studying penetration testing with a goal of becoming a certified professional, there’s no better toolkit — at any price — than Kali Linux.

Let me know your views and queries in the comment section below. Please follow us on facebook, youtube , instagram, google +, twitter buttons are provided on the header.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.